Dazey open this evening’s Lost In The Manor vs Hidden Herd night, with the atmosphere on this cold Saturday evening heating The Finsbury‘s smoke-filled back room. With members coming forth from previous bands such as Attu, they return with polished, mass appeal, utilising killer hooks and melodic vocals that speak to wide audiences. There are clear elements of noughties RnB in their sound; something that the twenty-somethings in the crowd quickly latch on to, which, when coupled with their soaring guitar riffs, brings it to the present day with noticeable power.

Photo of Dazey featured on Hidden Herd new music blog
Nature TV then grace the stage with their polished take on the melancholy beach vibes of Mac DeMarco. Their warm aura is welcome amidst the cold winter air that leaks through from the swinging doors, transporting us to warmer climes and evoking hazy memories of summers past. Channeling gentle Americana, they bring some of the easy-listening appeal of John Mayer, albeit with a little more consistency. The walking bass lines keep their set dynamic tonight and give their tunes a liquid quality, which allows the instruments to spill into each other with a beautiful ease. Latest single ‘Action‘ is the highlight, proving playful at the set’s midpoint, showing a depth that pushes their funk-laden beach pop even further.

Photo of Nature TV featured on Hidden Herd new music blog
Atlas Wynd then chime in to give us their grunge-soaked beach rock; a steady ode to fellow noisemakers The Hives and Kit Trigg in one fuzzy, unapologetic dose. Both heavy and sun-kissed, they bring a steady punch of noise to the venue as the room’s numbers begin to multiple. Their sheer volume and stage presence is almost juxtaposed by their modest three-strong setup, which shows they really know how to make a racket with what they have. Channeling some early Queens of the Stone Age along with the perfectly refrained simplicity of The White Stripes, their sound is both delightfully classic and forward-charging at the same time.

Photo of Nature TV featured on Hidden Herd new music blog
Photo of Atlas Wynd featured on Hidden Herd new music blog

Photo of Atlas Wynd featured on Hidden Herd new music blog
Our headliners Wooze then take to the stage in their trademark, vibrant matching attire. It has us harking back to Kill Bill, with the opening swell of noise bringing forth just as much bite and attitude as that flick’s insatiable focal point. Despite only being a duo, their sound immediately fills the room with melodic guitar licks and crisp percussion.

With elements of The 1975, their 80s charm screams through, easily cutting through much of the industry’s current rock sensibilities. Coupled with their visual strength, draped in eye-popping yellow and with dramatically-dyed hair, their performance is drenched in style and confidence. Coming at a time when the UK is screaming out for a band with such a strong notable trademark, their essence seems fresh and resonant, giving us the sense that this is the glam rock of 2017.

Photo of WOOZE featured on Hidden Herd new music blog
Their track ‘Hello Can You Go‘ has clear influences of four decades past, all whilst staying true to the stop-start percussion of the 80s, nodding at Tame Impala and Haim in the process. Matched with their soothing vocal harmonies, they offer an alternative approach to afro-pop-infused bands of the moment, taking formulas used by artists such as Field Music and pushing the boundaries to their limits with extra bite and kick.

Whilst still in their formative days, every aspect of Wooze‘s performance has a polished, honed appeal. A strong introduction for those who are new, their track releases will be waited upon with much anticipation.